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    Krista Washington
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    Baby bump: China eatery in Japan soars on pregnant panda hopes

    Baby bump: China eatery in Japan soars on pregnant panda hopesSwelling hopes for a baby panda in Tokyo have bumped up the stock price of a Chinese restaurant chain in the area, with locals setting their sights on a flurry of tourists. Eleven-year-old Shin Shin, who was brought to Ueno Zoo from China, has been showing signs of pregnancy since last week after mating with male Ri Ri in February, according to zoo officials. Giant pandas are notoriously clumsy at mating, with males said to be bad at determining when a female is in the right frame of mind and often befuddled at knowing what to do next.


    Device Purifies Air and Creates Energy All at the Same Time

    Device Purifies Air and Creates Energy All at the Same TimeA small innovation could have a big impact on air pollution. In Belgium, researchers have engineered a device that uses sunlight to purify polluted air and produce hydrogen gas that can be stored and used for power. "We couple both processes together in one device," Sammy Verbruggen, a professor of bioscience engineering at the University of Antwerp, told Live Science.


    This $3 Million Machine Tests Car Chassis While They re Sitting Still

    This $3 Million Machine Tests Car Chassis While They're Sitting StillEver seen a car corner at 1.00 g while it's not moving?


    The Exact Orbit Of The Outer Trappist Exoplanet Determined

    The Exact Orbit Of The Outer Trappist Exoplanet DeterminedThe Trappist exoplanets hold many mysteries bit their orbits are no longer one of them.


    Ethiopia: 3.3 million-year-old child skeleton rewrites history of how the human spine evolved

    Ethiopia: 3.3 million-year-old child skeleton rewrites history of how the human spine evolvedThe well preserved remains of a 3.3 million-year-old Australopithecus Afarensis have revealed that the spine of these early hominins was more similar to ours than to that of extant African apes. It counted 12 thoracic vertebrae, like the spine of modern humans, instead of 13. Recovered in the mid-2000s in Ethiopia, the skeleton is that of a small child, who was probably two or three at the time of death.


    Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments

    Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environmentsMount Everest is a grueling, deadly place for many adventurers. Beyond the steep terrain, bone-chilling temperatures, and fierce weather, the air is so thin that your body can begin to shut down. That is, unless you're a Sherpa. Members of the Nepalese ethnic group have evolved over generations to withstand the oxygen-deprived atmosphere high in the Himalayas, a new study found.  SEE ALSO: Now you can climb Mount Everest in VR Sherpas are, biologically speaking, extremely efficient at producing the energy they need to reach such heights, even where oxygen is scarce, according to research published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Their cells are akin to fuel-efficient cars that can travel farther on less fuel. A porter fetches the ladders to help fix the route for climbers attempting to reach the summit of Mount Everest.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockScientists say the findings not only help explain Sherpas' mountain-climbing prowess — they may also lead to new ways of treating oxygen deficiencies, called "hypoxia," in hospital patients. "By understanding how Sherpas are able to survive with low levels of oxygen, we can get clues to help us identify those at greatest risk in [intensive care units] and inform the development of better treatments to help in their recovery," Michael Grocott, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Southampton in England, said in a press release.  Grocott is the chair of Xtreme Everest, a 10-year-old initiative by doctors, nurses, and scientists to study how our bodies respond to the extreme altitude on Mount Everest. Their ultimate goal is to improve outcomes for critically ill patients. With a 29,029-foot-high peak, Everest is the world's highest mountain. Everest Base Camp is around 17,600 feet, which is plenty high enough to sicken unadjusted visitors. An aerial photograph of Everest Base Camp.Image: Paula Bronstein/Getty ImagesAt those altitudes, where oxygen is scarce, the body is forced to work overtime to make sure the brain and body receive enough oxygen to function. Often, the body will produce more red blood cells, which carry blood to our organs and thicken the blood. As a result, blood flows more slowly and blood vessels are prone to tightening, which can cause dangerous build-up of fluid in the lungs and other risks. Mountain climbers can combat this by bringing oxygen supplies and ascending slowly, giving their bodies time to adjust. Sherpas, however, don't need such a boost.  Previous studies have shown that Sherpas produce fewer red blood cells at higher altitudes. They also produce higher levels of nitric oxide, a chemical that opens blood vessels and keeps blood flowing, which in turn gives them more energy to climb. Sherpas' remarkable physical skills, along with their local expertise, have made them the go-to guides and porters for international expeditions. It's an imperfect arrangement, however. Nepalese guides in recent years have protested poor pay and unsafe working conditions, and in 2014, they went on strike after 16 colleagues were killed in an avalanche. People attend a prayer service in New York City for Sherpa victims of the April 18, 2014, avalanche on Mt. Everest.Image: eric thayer/Getty ImagesFor Monday's study, a research team led by scientists at the University of Cambridge followed 15 Sherpas and 10 "lowlanders" — researchers living in non-high altitude areas — as they gradually ascended to the base camp. The lowlanders took samples, including blood and muscle biopsies, at three different times: in London, for the baseline measurement; upon arrival to base camp; and after two months working at base camp.  They compared those samples to those of the Sherpas, all of whom lived in relatively low-lying areas, and none of whom were "elite" high-altitude climbers. Sherpas' baseline measurements were taken in Kathmandu, Nepal. At baseline, Sherpas' mitochondria — the parts of human cells that respire to generate energy — were already more efficient at using oxygen to produce ATP than those of lowlanders, the samples revealed. ATP, or molecule adenosine triphosphate, is the energy that powers our bodies. A porter walks with a massive load towards Everest Base Camp near Lobuche, Nepal.Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP/REX/ShutterstockSherpas' measurements hardly changed once they reached the base camp, suggesting they were born with such biological traits. Lowlanders, meanwhile, saw their measurements change as their bodies acclimatized and began to mimic the Sherpas'. After two months at camp, Sherpas also produced more phosphocreatine, an energy reserve that acts as a buffer to help muscles contract when no ATP is available. Lowlanders, by contrast, saw their phosphocreatine levels crash.  And, unlike lowlanders, Sherpas did not experience a rapid increase in free radicals, which are molecules created by a lack of oxygen that can potentially damage cells and tissues. "Sherpas have spent thousands of years living at high altitudes, so it should be unsurprising that they have adapted to become more efficient at using oxygen and generating energy," Andrew Murray, the study's senior author and a senior lecturer at the University of Cambridge, said in the press release.  "When those of us from lower-lying countries spend time at high altitude, our bodies adapt to some extent to become more 'Sherpa-like', but we are no match for their efficiency," he said. WATCH: Drone captures breathtaking footage of Norwegian mountains


    Incredible! Most Well-Preserved Armored Dinosaur Was a Spiky Tank

    Incredible! Most Well-Preserved Armored Dinosaur Was a 'Spiky Tank'Miners discovered the 18-foot-long (5.5 meters) beast — a nodosaur, a cousin of ankylosaurs, which also had body armor but didn't sport club tails — in 2011 during routine work at the Suncor Millennium Mine in Alberta. Soon after, the Suncor Energy company contacted the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Alberta, where the specimen has remained for the past six years, painstakingly being chiseled out, one inch at a time. "It was a very slow reveal, but it was a very exciting one nonetheless," said Caleb Brown, a postdoctoral fellow at the museum, and a co-author of a study describing the new species, which he expects to be published in a peer-reviewed journal this summer.


    China urges balance on environment, economy in Antarctica

    China urges balance on environment, economy in AntarcticaBEIJING (AP) — A Chinese leader on Tuesday urged international representatives to strike a "proper balance" between environmental and economic interests in Antarctica, as the frozen continent's vulnerability to climate change raises worries that some nations could seek to exploit its natural resources.


    Is Russia prepping for space war? 3 mystery satellites reactivated but no one knows what they can do

    Is Russia prepping for space war? 3 mystery satellites reactivated but no one knows what they can doRussia has reportedly reactivated three mysterious satellites, which remained idle over the past year or so, after they were launched into space between 2013 and 2015. After their initial launch, the three satellites reportedly shifted their orbits dramatically, exhibiting an unusual ability of manoeuvrability for small spacecraft. The trio of satellites, reportedly known by their codenames Kosmos-2491, Kosmos-2499 and Kosmos-2504 remained inactive for over a year.


    Manchester attack: three questions to consider

    Manchester attack: three questions to considerIn what has become an all-too-familiar occurrence, an apparent terrorist attack has once again struck the European public, this time at a concert by American singer Ariana Grande in Manchester, England, attended by thousands of pre-teen and teenaged girls. At the time of writing, the death toll was at 22, with more than 50 injured in what has been described as a suicide bombing just at the foyer of the Manchester Arena. Media reports and recent patterns suggest that the perpetrator is likely another radicalized, lone-wolf attacker, perhaps inspired by the so-called Islamic State, which has already claimed responsibility.


    Baby bump: China eatery in Japan soars on pregnant panda hopes

    Device Purifies Air and Creates Energy All at the Same Time

    This $3 Million Machine Tests Car Chassis While They re Sitting Still

    The Exact Orbit Of The Outer Trappist Exoplanet Determined

    Ethiopia: 3.3 million-year-old child skeleton rewrites history of how the human spine evolved

    Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments

    Incredible! Most Well-Preserved Armored Dinosaur Was a Spiky Tank

    China urges balance on environment, economy in Antarctica

    Is Russia prepping for space war? 3 mystery satellites reactivated but no one knows what they can do

    Manchester attack: three questions to consider

    News

    Baby bump: China eatery in Japan soars on pregnant panda hopes

    Swelling hopes for a baby panda in Tokyo have bumped up the stock price of a Chinese restaurant chain in the area, with locals setting their sights on a flurry of tourists. Eleven-year-old Shin Shin,

    Device Purifies Air and Creates Energy All at the Same Time

    A small innovation could have a big impact on air pollution. In Belgium, researchers have engineered a device that uses sunlight to purify polluted air and produce hydrogen gas that can be stored and

    This $3 Million Machine Tests Car Chassis While They re Sitting Still

    Ever seen a car corner at 1.00 g while it s not moving?

    The Exact Orbit Of The Outer Trappist Exoplanet Determined

    The Trappist exoplanets hold many mysteries bit their orbits are no longer one of them.

    Ethiopia: 3.3 million-year-old child skeleton rewrites history of how the human spine evolved

    The well preserved remains of a 3.3 million-year-old Australopithecus Afarensis have revealed that the spine of these early hominins was more similar to ours than to that of extant African apes. It c

    Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments

    Mount Everest is a grueling, deadly place for many adventurers. Beyond the steep terrain, bone-chilling temperatures, and fierce weather, the air is so thin that your body can begin to shut down. That

    Incredible! Most Well-Preserved Armored Dinosaur Was a Spiky Tank

    Miners discovered the 18-foot-long (5.5 meters) beast — a nodosaur, a cousin of ankylosaurs, which also had body armor but didn't sport club tails — in 2011 during routine work at the Suncor Millenniu

    China urges balance on environment, economy in Antarctica

    BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese leader on Tuesday urged international representatives to strike a proper balance between environmental and economic interests in Antarctica, as the frozen continent s vulner

    Is Russia prepping for space war? 3 mystery satellites reactivated but no one knows what they can do

    Russia has reportedly reactivated three mysterious satellites, which remained idle over the past year or so, after they were launched into space between 2013 and 2015. After their initial launch, the

    Manchester attack: three questions to consider

    In what has become an all-too-familiar occurrence, an apparent terrorist attack has once again struck the European public, this time at a concert by American singer Ariana Grande in Manchester, Englan

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    Baby bump: China eatery in Japan soars on pregnant panda hopes

    Swelling hopes for a baby panda in Tokyo have bumped up the stock price of a Chinese restaurant chain in the area, with locals setting their sights on a flurry of tourists. Eleven-year-old Shin Shin,

    Device Purifies Air and Creates Energy All at the Same Time

    A small innovation could have a big impact on air pollution. In Belgium, researchers have engineered a device that uses sunlight to purify polluted air and produce hydrogen gas that can be stored and

    This $3 Million Machine Tests Car Chassis While They re Sitting Still

    Ever seen a car corner at 1.00 g while it s not moving?

    The Exact Orbit Of The Outer Trappist Exoplanet Determined

    The Trappist exoplanets hold many mysteries bit their orbits are no longer one of them.

    Ethiopia: 3.3 million-year-old child skeleton rewrites history of how the human spine evolved

    The well preserved remains of a 3.3 million-year-old Australopithecus Afarensis have revealed that the spine of these early hominins was more similar to ours than to that of extant African apes. It c

    Sherpas show how the human body can thrive in extreme environments

    Mount Everest is a grueling, deadly place for many adventurers. Beyond the steep terrain, bone-chilling temperatures, and fierce weather, the air is so thin that your body can begin to shut down. That

    Incredible! Most Well-Preserved Armored Dinosaur Was a Spiky Tank

    Miners discovered the 18-foot-long (5.5 meters) beast — a nodosaur, a cousin of ankylosaurs, which also had body armor but didn't sport club tails — in 2011 during routine work at the Suncor Millenniu

    China urges balance on environment, economy in Antarctica

    BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese leader on Tuesday urged international representatives to strike a proper balance between environmental and economic interests in Antarctica, as the frozen continent s vulner

    Is Russia prepping for space war? 3 mystery satellites reactivated but no one knows what they can do

    Russia has reportedly reactivated three mysterious satellites, which remained idle over the past year or so, after they were launched into space between 2013 and 2015. After their initial launch, the

    Manchester attack: three questions to consider

    In what has become an all-too-familiar occurrence, an apparent terrorist attack has once again struck the European public, this time at a concert by American singer Ariana Grande in Manchester, Englan

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